DVD Sets depreciating in value

Back in 2005, I purchased all of the individual Seasons for Star Trek TOS, TNG, DS 9 Voyager and Enterprise .. A few months later I happened on the Animated Series in a Wal Mart and purchased it. for about $40 .. The others cost up to $100 each. I just did some comparing on Amazon and at Best buy.com and saw TOS Season 1 as low as 17.99 .. Seems like a lost my shirt so to speak

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Kevin Collins

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143 Comments

  1. Not at all shocked. It's been like that for years.

    When we dumped off our DVD's to the local used DVD/CD store, pretty much every movie went for anywhere between $1 and maybe $5. And there were at the time still fairly popular movies/discs.

    So don't expect to become rich by reselling DVD's or BD discs. The market is drying up.

  2. John*Wells

    Back in 2005, I purchased all of the individual Seasons for Star Trek TOS, TNG, DS 9 Voyager and Enterprise .. A few months later I happened on the Animated Series in a Wal Mart and purchased it. for about $40 .. The others cost up to $100 each. I just did some comparing on Amazon and at Best buy.com and saw TOS Season 1 as low as 17.99 .. Seems like a lost my shirt so to speak

    Ho so? Did you consider them investments?

  3. I think there are some folks who actually do think many of the discs in their collections are "collectors" items and will some day fetch a pretty penny.

    Sadly as OP found out, nobody is interested anymore in paying a premium for something on disc anymore. Maybe 15 years ago the opposite was true, but not today.

  4. JQuintana

    I think there are some folks who actually do think many of the discs in their collections are "collectors" items and will some day fetch a pretty penny.

    Sadly as OP found out, nobody is interested anymore in paying a premium for something on disc anymore. Maybe 15 years ago the opposite was true, but not today.

    See the prices for OOP Criterion title or perhaps Twilight Time's "The Egyptian". Not sure about DVD sets though, I can see the market for those titles perhaps not being worth much, particularly if they've been upgraded to bluray.

  5. Prices can be $1000 a disc, problem is who's actually buying them? My brother in law always thought his Star Wars toys were worth "$500"…or "almost $1000", in reality that was just a number. Nobody was paying that and all his stuff was dumped off for literally pennies on the dollar years later.

    Not saying there are a tiny fraction of a percent of folks out there who would open their wallet for a rare disc, but that's a RARE case in this day an age. Just the diehard old troop of DVD enthusiasts from 1997 could make that market survive a bit longer.

  6. I agree this stuff can't be looked at as an investment. Hopefully you get pleasure from having your collection at your fingertips to watch anytime you want. For an investment try diamonds or maybe gold.

  7. John Dirk

    Ho so? Did you consider them investments?

    At the time, I did because they were the 2004 releases in those Cool Star Fleet badge Cases for TOS .. when I bought TOS I figured I was done because I never watched The others when they ran but I bought them and actually enjoyed them .. I'm not planning to Sell them. I just thought the Value would go up since the Originals are OOP or If Paramount decided it was no longer going to market them

  8. I recently purchased the complete series blu-ray of TNG. I have all of the original DVD sets, some still shrinkwrapped. I'm not sure I can even give them away, aside from just dumping them in the donations box at Goodwill.

  9. We're in that transition phase like VHS was. Top dollar tapes that were hard to find phased into worthless hunks of plastic and ended up in landfills. DVD and to an extent Blu discs are slowly moving that direction. The day will come that even these "used DVD" comic book stores will stop taking in any more movies on disc and will have to dump their store inventory off to a dump or maybe donate them.

    The days of discs being of any used monetary value are about done.

  10. I don't believe in depreciation, it's all about finding the right buyer who's shopping for what you're selling and is willing to pay your price. I have several classic TV show DVD sets that have gone out of print, I'm not looking to sell any of them at this time but if I would list them online I have no doubt that I would sell them.

    It's the same thing with VHS. There are still people who use VHS and are shopping for movies on VHS. If I chose to, I could list my VHS collection online, these tapes are long out of print and I have no doubt that I would sell those too.

  11. John*Wells

    . I just thought the Value would go up since the Originals are OOP or If Paramount decided it was no longer going to market them

    Yep and as @BobO’Link stated, that could very well be the case if you come across the right individual at the right time.

  12. Lecagr

    I don't believe in depreciation, it's all about finding the right buyer who's shopping for what you're selling and is willing to pay your price.

    I wouldn't go that far. Try selling your car if you don't believe in depreciation. 🙂 I do see your point though. I think that's the basic concept that started eBay. The problem was locating an interested buyer and they solved it. Too bad they steal so much of your potential profit in fees but that's another discussion.

  13. Ever since the first day I walked into a used video store and saw how cheaply second hand sets went for, I new collecting for resale would be pointless. Maybe, if I wanted to sell my set of It Takes A Thief, I might get a decent price from someone who wanted it, but naaaaah.

    Nobody takes care of their discs anyway. It's a sucker's game.

  14. John Dirk

    I wouldn't go that far. Try selling your car if you don't believe in depreciation. 🙂 I do see your point though. I think that's the basic concept that started eBay. The problem was locating an interested buyer and they solved it. Too bad they steal so much of your potential profit in fees but that's another discussion.

    Cars depreciate over time but it's a little different with nostalgic collectibles like DVD's, VHS, vinyl records and comic books. There will always be people shopping for these types of collectibles. It's just about finding the person who's interested in what you're selling.

  15. ScottRE

    Maybe, if I wanted to sell my set of It Takes A Thief, I might get a decent price from someone who wanted it, but naaaaah.

    LOL, speaking of It Takes A Thief, currently on ebay someone is selling a brand new complete series set, still sealed in the shrinkwrap. The sellers price is $329.00 but is also taking offers. Anyone here interested in taking a shot at this? The set I bought recently is used but it's in very good condition.

  16. JQuintana

    You'd have to have a very..very deep rooted love for an old 2 season TV series to want to pay that kind of crazy cash. Wow!

    The reason for the high price is because the DVD set is now out of print.

    There is currently another still sealed set of It Takes A Thief on ebay, with this one the sellers price is $299.99 but is not taking offers.

  17. The DVD for the 1978 SciFi comedy series Quark is currently going for $85.99 on Amazon. Don't remember what it sold for upon release in 2008 but I ended up buying my copy for $44.95 back in 2016. This DVD is commanding even higher (and outrageous) prices on eBay as Its obviously out of print.

  18. The Star Trek sets were way overpriced so they may not be the fairest example. I wouldn't even consider $100 a season and waited for them to go down significantly. Would do the same today, where you can pick up the complete Batman The Animated Series for well under that sticker and on Blu-ray.

    Never understood what Paramount was thinking but I guess it worked for them.

  19. JQuintana

    I think there are some folks who actually do think many of the discs in their collections are "collectors" items and will some day fetch a pretty penny.

    Sadly as OP found out, nobody is interested anymore in paying a premium for something on disc anymore. Maybe 15 years ago the opposite was true, but not today.

    Dead wrong. There are many titles that go well above $100 new and used like this one.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ark-II-The…h=item1c8b79c485:g:vGcAAOSw0TxZaP59:rk:7:razz:f:0

    I watch nearly every auction and they seldom get below the $100 asking price.

  20. Something can go for a high price on ebay only because 2 people get into a bidding war. Then someone else sees what it sold for and they put a copy up and that winds up selling for a fraction of the previous auction. That's because maybe only 2 people wanted it and that got reduced to one!

    On the subject of DVDs, if you really want something, why wouldn't you get it when it was released rather than waiting until it goes out of print and the price skyrockets?

  21. Neil Brock

    Something can go for a high price on ebay only because 2 people get into a bidding war. Then someone else sees what it sold for and they put a copy up and that winds up selling for a fraction of the previous auction. That's because maybe only 2 people wanted it and that got reduced to one!

    On the subject of DVDs, if you really want something, why wouldn't you get it when it was released rather than waiting until it goes out of print and the price skyrockets?

    All you have to do is "watch" the auctions on E-Bay these out of print titles sell for inflated prices constantly. I know from experience. I have also sold some used DVD titles myself for over 5 times what I paid for them new.

  22. Richard V

    My philosophy is collect things that are of intrinsic value to you, no matter what the extrinsic value is. That way, you'll never be disappointed later.

    (As an aside).

    If I really wanted to make big bucks on speculation, the collectables market is the last place I would be looking at.

  23. Neil Brock

    On the subject of DVDs, if you really want something, why wouldn't you get it when it was released rather than waiting until it goes out of print and the price skyrockets?

    I guess it just depends on circumstances. In the case of It Takes A Thief, when the set came out in 2011 I was thinking about getting it, but at the time it wasn't really a high priority. Forward seven years later to 2018, I decide I'm ready to buy the DVD's only to find out they've gone out of print, and I end up buying a used set for about $200. The set is in very good condition, it's almost like new and I like the show so I figure it was worth it. And if down the line I decide I'm done with the DVD set and would like to sell it, I imagine I could sell it for $200 or maybe a little more.

  24. BobO’Link

    Quark had a $19.95 MSRP. IIRC I paid ~$13 for my copy about 6 months following release. No… it's not for sale.

    BUT …
    it’s an investment!!
    You can get over a 600% return!!!!

    I bet you even took it off the pile on the shelf and removed the plastic. Probably watched it too (more than once).

  25. Perfect example. The initial pressing of Fright Night, after all copies sold out, it sold on ebay for up to 10 times its' original value. Then a second pressing, value declined. Now another release coming out, value will drop even more. It is a matter of timing.

  26. Richard V

    Perfect example. The initial pressing of Fright Night, after all copies sold out, it sold on ebay for up to 10 times its' original value. Then a second pressing, value declined. Now another release coming out, value will drop even more. It is a matter of timing.

    And that in 1999 during the infant stages of DVD and folks were ramping up big time to get their hands on everything they could.

    Now the DVD goes for $6 NEW on Amazon.

  27. Richard V

    My philosophy is collect things that are of intrinsic value to you, no matter what the extrinsic value is. That way, you'll never be disappointed later.

    100% agree with this. I've never understood the mentality of collecting something, not to enjoy it, but for hopes of future resale. Those people who collect toys and comics, yet never take anything out of its box or plastic covering for fear it will lose its value. Just never got that. Hey, if that's your bag, enjoy it. But the stuff I collect – books, DVDs and Blu-Rays – is stuff I want to use. I don't see any point in doing otherwise.

    In a way, being overseas most of my adult life has helped. For years, I was rarely in a position to buy a movie or TV show released in the U.S. when they were first released. I had to wait for sales and stock up when I made my annual visit home in the summer. This resulted in my rarely buying anything at full retail. I have more money at my disposal now but still try to buy nearly everything I want at the lowest price point I can find. I'm willing to wait a long time to get it. Sometimes I miss out, and things go out of print. But countless other times, I've bought sets brand new for a mere fraction of their original price. It works for me, keeps a handle on my purchasing (limited to only a few titles a month, averaged out over the year)…and, as an added bonus, keeps my wife happy.

  28. I agree 100% with Richard V and Jeff F.

    I don't collect movies with the hope that they will someday be worth enough money that I can retire.

    I collect movies because I enjoy collecting movies.

    I think my disc purchases generally fall into one of three categories:
    1) New releases that I first saw theatrically and know that I would like to re-watch regularly. These days, that's generally Marvel Studios movies, Star Wars movies, Star Trek movies and similar titles that I can probably best describe as "comfort food." I don't get tired of comfort food and these get watched enough that the price is more than justified. I do a re-watch through the entire MCU every summer, and I do Star Wars towards the end of every year, to name two examples.

    2) Movies I'm interested in seeing but aren't readily available in anything other than a physical format. Easy example: in 2016, I decided I was going to watch each and every film that Cary Grant made in his career, a total of 72 films, most of which I had never seen before. Many of those films were not available on streaming services (both a la carte rental/purchase services like iTunes and subscription services like Netflix). The choice was either to buy a disc, or to not see the movie. Since I wanted to see the movie, I bought the disc. That's not necessarily my preferred option when I don't know whether or not I'll want to re-watch the title, but it's a minor inconvenience and not a deal breaker. I remind myself that where I live, a single ticket to a standard 2D theatrical movie presentation is $17 (and premium formats like IMAX are over $25). This means that in many cases, buying a disc is still cheaper than it would cost to go out and see a movie in theaters. Maybe that comparison is a rationalization, but I've decided that if I'm willing to spend $27 to see a new movie in IMAX, or $17 to see a new movie at my local regular theater, paying $15 for a disc that I can watch more than once if I choose isn't outrageous.

    As a subset of this category, I'm a 3D fan, and there are almost no options available for streaming 3D content. The few that I have explored are far inferior to discs in terms of quality. I am more willing to make a blind buy on a 3D disc than just about anything else, because that's usually the only way to see that title in that format. I realize that this won't apply to many other people, but it's true for me.

    3) Movies I'm interested in seeing that are cheaper to get on disc than to stream. Another easy example: starting in 2016, I decided that I wanted to explore the western genre since that's a type of film I had very little experience with. A big part of that was viewing different John Wayne films. There are some incredible deals to be had on physical media, either directly from studios who have created combo packs at reduced prices, or from retailers trying to clear out excess stock. A movie called "The Searchers" came highly recommended to me, and when I was looking it up, I discovered that I could stream it digitally on a $5 rental, or I could spend $6 to get it on Blu-ray in a combo back with two other John Wayne movies that I was also interested in seeing. So in that scenario, I could have spent $15 to rent all three titles individually, or I could have spent $6 to buy the Blu-ray combo pack. Obviously the combo pack was the smarter decision. I liked the movies, so I kept it. But if I hadn't, I wouldn't have had any problem with giving away the set or selling it back to a used bookshop, even if they only gave me a few pennies for it. The point was to see the movies, which I did. That I ended up with a copy that I can keep indefinitely, that was just a bonus.

    I have no issue with periodically going through my collection and weeding through the titles and getting rid of stuff that no longer appeals to me. But what I'm finding is that, as I've gotten better at making smarter purchases, the amount of stuff I don't want anymore is a smaller and smaller percentage of the shelf each time. But I am noticing this amusingly weird split of titles, because most things on the shelf now are either things that I truly adore and watch frequently, or something that the only way to see it was by buying a disc, and I liked it enough to at least hold onto it in case I want to see it again but don't revisit often.

  29. Adam Lenhardt

    It'll be interesting to see if disc-based media gets a second life someday, the way vinyl records have.

    I think it's certainly possible, especially in smaller numbers. I think right now there's a little bit of culture shock going on, as the studios and all of the associated businesses are coming to terms with a change in technology and customer habits. But at a certain point, it's going to level off, and I think there will still be a small but passionate audience interested in collecting physical formats.

    I also think that, perhaps simultaneously to that, that it will become apparent that a zillion different streaming services won't be able to co-exist. We probably have a few more years of rapid expansion of streaming options before they begin to contract, but if/when that starts to happen, I wouldn't be shocked if the surviving streaming services take a long hard look at the different offerings on their services and start questioning how much of this content is being regularly accessed vs. how much it's costing to keep on an active server and in compatible formats. I don't think a classic show like "Twilight Zone" or "Star Trek" will go so far out of favor that it wouldn't be worth keeping available perpetually. But I could imagine that there could be plenty of things which just don't get clicked on or played, particularly older shows from the 4×3, pre-digital era. And I wonder if that's the opportunity for physical to hang on, perhaps more in a MOD capacity than a pressed capacity. Ten or twenty years from now, if you want to do a Twilight Zone marathon, you'll probably still be able to stream it. But if you want access to a show that's not as well remembered and not as popular, maybe purchasing it on an MOD disc will be the way to get it.

    I just wonder if the maintenance costs associated with keeping digital content readily available and ready to stream at a touch of a button will eventually make it impractical to keep every single everything on different services. If you run a platform like iTunes and you have a television series or a film that no one has rented or purchased or streamed once in ten years, will you want to keep that content available with all of the associated maintenance costs just in case someone happens to want it one day, or will it just not be worth it to you as the owner of that business? I'm curious to see what the answer to that will be.

  30. Josh Steinberg

    I agree 100% with Richard V and Jeff F.

    I don't collect movies with the hope that they will someday be worth enough money that I can retire.

    I collect movies because I enjoy collecting movies.

    I think my disc purchases generally fall into one of three categories:
    1) New releases that I first saw theatrically and know that I would like to re-watch regularly.

    2) Movies I'm interested in seeing but aren't readily available in anything other than a physical format.

    3) Movies I'm interested in seeing that are cheaper to get on disc than to stream.

    For options 2 (and 3), I’m always puzzled about why so many members here don’t use their library system. Almost all films released on disc (especially DVD) are at some library somewhere. And almost all libraries share their holdings.

    I read all the time about ‘blind-buys’, where the local library is free.

    Just seems like a waste of money to me.

    Then again, I can’t wrap my head around hundreds of discs, still in plastic either.

  31. David, that’s an excellent point. I think for me, it’s just not convenient to visit the library. I have a job with non-traditional hours that in practice means that the library isn’t open when I’m off.

    (I’m skeptical that my local library would have, or have access to, something obscure like Olive’s Blu-ray releases of the John Wayne Three Mesqueteers b-movie series, but I admit I just have no idea.)

    At a certain point, I know I’m paying for convenience. It’s all about balance for me. Sometimes it’s worth it to put the extra effort into finding something at a super cheap price or for free; sometimes my time is more valuable and it’s more worthwhile for me to spend a few extra bucks to avoid the legwork.

  32. David Weicker

    For options 2 (and 3), I’m always puzzled about why so many members here don’t use their library system. Almost all films released on disc (especially DVD) are at some library somewhere. And almost all libraries share their holdings.

    I read all the time about ‘blind-buys’, where the local library is free.

    Just seems like a waste of money to me.

    Then again, I can’t wrap my head around hundreds of discs, still in plastic either.

    Practicality if you live in a rural area.

    The only Bluray discs my local has are basically the one's I gave them.

    Average wait time to get a Bluray set shipped in is 6 weeks.
    Chances of getting the correct fully functioning set of discs – is nearly zero. Either I've gotten the DVD set, A set of mixed discs of S3 and S6. 4 of 6 discs that should be there, an obviously damaged disc that I wouldn't even attempt to put in my cheapest player, or a good chance that a disc won't play due to the usual consumers tendency to treat them as a combination of frisbees, cleaning with brillo pads, a jenga game or 'how many can I stack on top of one another, a burned 'replacement' disc that someone decided wouldn't be noticed, or some other useful human tendency.

    After 5 or 6 unsuccessful attempts to get a single functional TV sets (not much better on individual movies), it was obvious that it wasn't for me.

  33. The trick with the library is to order a copy of a new movie when it first comes out and before it gets damaged. Everything on our system is on line. The collection is distributed over many libraries in the city and all you have to do is go to the website, do a few clicks and you get what you want in a day or 2 delivered to your local branch.

  34. Whenever I think anything I collect is an investment, I remember the “great beanie baby collapse of ‘02”.

    My daughter was about 8 years old when she expressed mild interest in them. Before we knew it, we were scouring the area trying to get the entire set and subscribing to two different Beanie Baby magazines.

    The newest Beanies cost $10.00 but some “rare” ones and out of print ones went as high as $40.00 and up. We bought special tag protectors and plastic cases for the rare ones. We discovered a store that would call us when each new series came out and all we had to do was pick them up at the store. Before we knew it, we had hundreds of them.

    Then in seconds it was over. The bottom fell out, and no one wanted them. We sold them at garage sales for $5.00, then $1.00, then 50 cents. We gave the last few dozens to charity.

  35. I always go to my local library to check out a movie I wanted to see If I missed it at the theater or never saw it before. Good example is the Criterion released of True Stories which I checked out the DVD and liked the film enough to buy the blu-ray.

  36. A good rule of thumb is that mass-produced consumer goods and technology do not go up in value. VHS to DVD to Blu-ray should by now make it very clear that what's new hotness today will be old and busted tomorrow.

    Also, beanie babies, baseball, and Magic the Gathering cards.

    The exception is if you're smart / lucky enough to spot a fad and get in and out before the bubble bursts.

  37. DaveF

    A good rule of thumb is that mass-produced consumer goods and technology do not go up in value. VHS to DVD to Blu-ray should by now make it very clear that what's new hotness today will be old and busted tomorrow.

    Also, beanie babies, baseball, and Magic the Gathering cards.

    The exception is if you're smart / lucky enough to spot a fad and get in and out before the bubble bursts.

    Also lots of historical precedents of this: tulips, railway stocks, airline stocks, dotcom stocks, etc …

    Financial history is filled with tons of stuff like this.

  38. My wife recently told me about Marie Kondo, who is having a bit of a pop culture moment with a book about tidying up, and if I’m getting this right, it’s all about decluttering and feeling better when you’re not surrounded by stuff you don’t enjoy. The whole idea basically boils down to, if it doesn’t bring you joy to possess it, get rid of it. If I’m remembering right – this was all of a 30 second conversation.

    My dad is selling his house and a lot of my old stuff from childhood and college and the years immediately following are stored up there. I’ve had to go back and sort through everything and it’s been an eye opening experience. Most of the stuff I had up there, which I had thought was important to me, meant nothing when I picked it up. I got rid of so many things I never thought I’d want to let go of. It was an easy decision.

    Compare that to my disc collection, which is with me in my home. My collection brings me joy. That’s why I keep it.

    I don’t think most of it has much by way of monetary value but it has been and continues to be a source of joy. As long as that’s true, I’ll keep it. If that changes, I won’t.

  39. David Weicker

    For options 2 (and 3), I’m always puzzled about why so many members here don’t use their library system. Almost all films released on disc (especially DVD) are at some library somewhere. And almost all libraries share their holdings.

    I read all the time about ‘blind-buys’, where the local library is free.

    Just seems like a waste of money to me.

    Then again, I can’t wrap my head around hundreds of discs, still in plastic either.

    Definitely not true that almost all dvds released are available in libraries. Where I live only dvds are those that are donated by the public are available.They cannot be borrowed and must be watched in the library.

  40. Josh Steinberg

    David, that’s an excellent point. I think for me, it’s just not convenient to visit the library. I have a job with non-traditional hours that in practice means that the library isn’t open when I’m off.

    (I’m skeptical that my local library would have, or have access to, something obscure like Olive’s Blu-ray releases of the John Wayne Three Mesqueteers b-movie series, but I admit I just have no idea.)

    At a certain point, I know I’m paying for convenience. It’s all about balance for me. Sometimes it’s worth it to put the extra effort into finding something at a super cheap price or for free; sometimes my time is more valuable and it’s more worthwhile for me to spend a few extra bucks to avoid the legwork.

    You are correct, not everything might be available. For kicks, I checked and found The Night Riders (Blu from Olive) is available to the New York Public Library system. As for your access, I can't speak to that.

  41. David Weicker

    You are correct, not everything might be available. For kicks, I checked and found The Night Riders (Blu from Olive) is available to the New York Public Library system. As for your access, I can't speak to that.

    Thanks for looking into that, you’ve sparked my curiousity – might just have to give the library another look 🙂

  42. In my part of Canada, (close to Toronto), our library system buys multiple copies of virtually every new movie and TV show on DVD and Blu ray, and many catalogue titles and even Warner Archive. When you borrow a copy you get to take it home and keep it for a week. It does sometimes take a while to get the one you reserve.

  43. Try that in a city where the Public Library is open 2.5 days a week b/c it's not important enough to fund fully to keep open 6-7 days a week.
    "everybody's got the internet and Amazon, why should we waste tax dollars on something so useless to the majority of the county/region/state"

  44. I have several of the 2011 recalled FUGITIVE MOST WANTED EDITIONS, still in factory shrink wrap. I think those might fetch a price, but who knows? It may be so long ago that no one even cares about those anymore, either.

  45. Lecagr

    Cars depreciate over time but it's a little different with nostalgic collectibles like DVD's, VHS, vinyl records and comic books. There will always be people shopping for these types of collectibles. It's just about finding the person who's interested in what you're selling.

    I think in most cases, though, supply is going to far exceed demand.

    About the only discs worth anything these days are ones that are rare or have gone OOP. Occasionally I'll find such a disc in a pawn shop, buy it and flip it, but otherwise, anything else should simply be bought for your (or someone else's) entertainment only, not because you think it'll increase in (or maintain) monetary value.

  46. When I Purchased Star Trek TOS Season 1 I noticed on the back of the Cardboard Holder, it stated Subject to change without notice. At the time, that suggested to me that these were limited release. Thats why I paid the High Price Paramount (And Best Buy) were asking

  47. David Weicker

    For options 2 (and 3), I’m always puzzled about why so many members here don’t use their library system. Almost all films released on disc (especially DVD) are at some library somewhere. And almost all libraries share their holdings.

    I read all the time about ‘blind-buys’, where the local library is free.

    Just seems like a waste of money to me.

    Then again, I can’t wrap my head around hundreds of discs, still in plastic either.

    I agree with you on the blind buys and shrink wrapped stuff, but at our small library, they have maybe a 4 foot single shelf of random movies, most of which are old stuff and since they are free to use, people treat them like crap. So they are all scratched up and covered in funk. The library doesn't have a disc buffer or cleaner so the discs just keep getting beat up.

    Now there can be some gems there but it's rare.

  48. TJPC

    In my part of Canada, (close to Toronto), our library system buys multiple copies of virtually every new movie and TV show on DVD and Blu ray, and many catalogue titles and even Warner Archive. When you borrow a copy you get to take it home and keep it for a week. It does sometimes take a while to get the one you reserve.

    The library has blu-rays? You're lucky – Toronto's library system is DVD only.

  49. I usually order the DVD and Blu ray of whatever movie I want to see and watch whatever comes in first. They also withdraw discs that are damaged when you tell them about it, and send them in for repairs. This is the Hamilton system by the way.

  50. In our library system there is one that still has the VHS tape set of Kevin Brownlow's Hollywood, A Celebration of the Silent Film and I do check it out once awhile. Glad I have one VCR that still works.

  51. DVDs and Blu-rays have never been investments, or even very collectible. And I've bought thousands of them. For me the value is in wanting to own the content they contain. Economically most of their value is in the "new release" phase of an initial 30-60 days or so and then a long tail of nominal incremental sales. But the reality is as a physical good they are a cheap near-worthless commodity, and particularly for those published by the big studios, their scarcity is artificial. The content still exists somewhere and can be replicated again anytime there is sufficient demand. Which in most cases there won't be.

    I recall a story a few years about truckloads of thousands of WB DVDs, mostly old TV shows, that remained unsold. Dukes of Hazard, Magnum PI and such. WB paid some vendor to destroy them all, and then I think there was a lawsuit when they all started showing up on eBay. But presumably a lot of these DVD sets were still profitable for the companies that cranked them out by the droves, even if there was a landfill of unsold stocks of worthless plastic laying around somewhere.

    Unlike vinyl though these disc formats, and DVD in particular, are not durable. I've had a few pressed DVDs that have failed with age, mostly related to those that were defectively manufactured for WB from 2006-2008, but a few others. So within a decade or so the longevity of any DVD becomes suspect due to rot. Blu-rays are better in this regard, with better coatings and a supposed shelf life of up to 100 years maybe.

    I've been buying discs long enough to see a few sets go OOP and command wildly inflated used prices, maybe a few hundred dollars at most. Often these were fairly old or early releases, and usually there is a newer improved release a few years later if there was really any demand for it. Then the prices for the old release will drop accordingly. A lot of really old DVD releases were also not anamorphic or had awful letterboxing, etc. At this point a lot of stuff that has gone OOP is also showing up on streaming services. And even when it hasn't, the demand for physical media in general is dropping and so are prices for "rare" sets. Only so many people still want this stuff physically. If anything I think some of the "rare" discs I'm still looking to acquire will become more reasonable, or sellers with any sense will be more inclined to accept my reasonable offers.

  52. Even if your local library system is not a robust supplier of DVDs or Blu-rays, it probably has some version of Interlibrary Loan that you can use to request circulating items from other library systems (at least in within the US).

    It can be cumbersome and take a while to receive your item, but I've used it to reel in some surprisingly rare imports and OOP discs, as well as a steady stream of DVDs (and books) that I just don't want to buy. Recently I got my hands on the '80s Casablanca series this way, after noticing that the Olive DVD set had abruptly dropped out of print and gotten expensive on the secondary market.

    The catch is that there are a lot of titles this won't work on because no participating libraries have a copy they'll share. As a rule of thumb, find the disc you're looking for in worldcat.org, and if more than 10 libraries have a copy, you'll probably get it. Fewer than 10 and you may be wasting your time. Most of the Warner Archive discs are in enough libraries for ILL to work, for instance, but I haven't had much success with Sony, MGM, or Fox MODs.

  53. Bradskey

    I recall a story a few years about truckloads of thousands of WB DVDs, mostly old TV shows, that remained unsold. Dukes of Hazard, Magnum PI and such. WB paid some vendor to destroy them all, and then I think there was a lawsuit when they all started showing up on eBay. But presumably a lot of these DVD sets were still profitable for the companies that cranked them out by the droves, even if there was a landfill of unsold stocks of worthless plastic laying around somewhere.

    I think what you're talking about is the infamous incident where WB paid someone to destroy a bunch of DVDs (and some blu-rays, too) and instead of doing that, this vendor sold the stock to Big Lots (who didn't know they were on the receiving end of a shady deal). There were threads on here and DVDTalk (and other places) about what was being found at Big Lots (and for what prices). Mostly TV stuff, some things that were even hard to find. Looney Tunes Golden Collection sets, Night Court, Smallville, Adventures of Superman, Flinstones (and other H-B stuff), Popeye, Woody Woodpecker, Wild Wild West, Wonder Woman, ER, Popeye and also titles for studios which WB was merely the distributor for, such as HBO (Tales from the Crypt, Tracey Takes On…) and BBC Video (I know of at least Claws of Axos being spotted).

    Most of these titles were about $6.00 to $10. each in the initial "wave", and nearer the end, a lot of sets were going as cheap as $3.00 each. I know I bought a bunch of stuff (though never saw some of the titles other people did) and I remember there being a major stink raised over this by WB. When this stuff first started showing up, I bellieve most people thought WB was liquidating stuff to Big Lots, not that it was destined for the landfill.

    Now, since this stuff was dirt cheap in some cases, there were speculators who bought lots of stuff which did end up appearing on eBay (those Popeye sets, for instance), but that was after it had gone to Big Lots first.

  54. I look at these sets the same way I look at my comic collection… worthless to anyone but me, and if I resell them it will likely be for pennies.

    Sure, there's probably some valuable ones I could make money on if I tried, but the bulk of them are essentially worthless. And I'm okay with that.

  55. AndyMcKinney

    I think what you're talking about is the infamous incident where WB paid someone to destroy a bunch of DVDs (and some blu-rays, too) and instead of doing that, this vendor sold the stock to Big Lots (who didn't know they were on the receiving end of a shady deal).

    Yes I'm sure that is the same incident, I didn't recall all the particulars. My roundabout point is that the physical discs, packaging and all, have virtually no real intrinsic economic value. They have simply been a medium of exchange or delivery in order to grant a license to view digital content in a world traditionally accustomed to physical purchases and possessions. The real economic value of DVDs and Blu-rays mostly existed as a combination of artificial scarcity (or lack thereof) and newness and exclusivity upon initial release. While retailers might maintain prices on copies of some of these DVD sets at a high level for years in some cases, the overall trend was that the prices were gradually discounted and the sales of any individual title would decline to a modest level fairly quickly after initial release.

    That's not of course to say that disc-based media has no value at all. To me the value is in that I can both license the content and also have it in medium that allows me to retain control in a fashion very similar to physical possessions. That does include the right to sell it to someone else, even if there is little to be gained. But the real value is that random X streaming service or digital copy service can't arbitrarily decide that i can no longer access the content I "paid for", either because their own licenses with the content owners have expired or because the distribution and delivery technology has been deprecated. We've seen both of those scenarios already.

    I don't insist on the advantages of physical media for all content. I do streaming, I rent streams occasionally, and I even "buy" streaming digital copies if it's convenient. Usually these are new release films and such, which I'm fairly certain I won't care about watching more than once anyway. For my physical collection I do of course "format shift" it all to digital copies on a NAS, as it really is not reasonable to expect a customer who has purchased thousands of single and mult-disc sets to dig through his bins and piles of discs every time he wants to casually see something he remembers he owns, but may not remember which box it is in now.

  56. I'm concerned as well about the problem with pressed DVD's and disc rot. Fortunately at this time all my DVD's are playing fine, but one DVD set in particular, my DVD set of Space 1999, some of those discs look pretty bad and show obvious signs of disc rot. The discs still play fine in my DVD player but I wonder how long they will continue to play considering how bad the playing surfaces look.

    DVD-R's are supposedly a problem too, because the purple dye layer on the discs is said to dry up over time and recorded material on the discs will eventually become unplayable. Not good.

  57. AndyMcKinney

    I think in most cases, though, supply is going to far exceed demand.

    About the only discs worth anything these days are ones that are rare or have gone OOP. Occasionally I'll find such a disc in a pawn shop, buy it and flip it, but otherwise, anything else should simply be bought for your (or someone else's) entertainment only, not because you think it'll increase in (or maintain) monetary value.

    You make a valid point but I do believe that there is a buyer for everything, the right individual just has to come along.

    Things I have collected over the years are for my entertainment, I have the stuff because I like it. Having said that, I do have some interesting collections and if at some point decide to sell some or all of it, I'd have to see what the market value would be. I'm sure I could make some money if I sold my collections but no I don't expect to get rich from it.

  58. JQuintana

    Not good for sure, but I'm sure most folks didn't or don't believe these discs of plastic and glue were meant to last a lifetime.

    DVD's aren't expected to last a lifetime but should last longer than they do. What is the current life expectancy of DVD's? About 10 or 15 years? That isn't very long. I have some VHS cassettes that are over 30 years old and still play perfect like they are new. In some ways, VHS is better than DVD because the good quality tapes seem to last longer.

  59. BobO’Link

    Why not? I have almost 40 year old CDs that play just fine. Why wouldn't I expect the same from a DVD?

    It could be that CD's & DVD's that are manufactured with better quality materials tend to last longer. And it also depends on how the discs are handled and stored. If the discs are handled carefully and stored in a cool/dry location they should last longer too.

    That Space 1999 DVD set I have, A & E released it, they probably used the cheapest quality discs they could find because the disc rot on those discs is pretty bad. Some look worse than others, but all of them show some form of disc rot.

  60. BobO’Link

    Why not? I have almost 40 year old CDs that play just fine. Why wouldn't I expect the same from a DVD?

    Exactly. When I began purchasing DVDs in earnest I was in my 40’s and certainly expected them to last as long as I do! At least 35 to 40 years. If that’s not gonna happen then I for one feel somewhat cheated on the product and what we were originally lead to believe about their longevity.

  61. I'm almost 55 so I've been around the electronics block. 🙂

    But I don't recall every reading about or seeing disc makers say that DVD's will survive 50+ years or any amount of years for that matter. Users on forums have claimed it maybe, but not manufacturers that I ever saw.

  62. JQuintana

    Where did any studio or movie disc maker state in writing that discs would last "X" amount of years? I know of NONE. So how can you feel "cheated"? It was and is a gamble to own these.

    Kindly note the wording in my post. Where did I state that studios or 'movie disc makers' [your wording, not mine] stated that dvds would last so many years? I did not state that so don't argue a straw man with me. But there were many comments, from multiple online sites, that these discs could be expected to last anywhere from 50 to 100 years. It's axiomatic so I'm not going to argue it with you.

  63. Josh Steinberg

    My wife recently told me about Marie Kondo…

    Have you watched any of the show? I’ve seen some of the articles about her, but haven’t watched it yet. I’m wondering if it’s worth checking out.

  64. Gary OS

    Kindly note the wording in my post. Where did I state that studios or 'movie disc makers' [your wording, not mine] stated that dvds would last so many years? I did not state that so don't argue a straw man with me. But there were many comments, from multiple online sites, that these discs could be expected to last anywhere from 50 to 100 years. It's axiomatic so I'm not going to argue it with you.

    I suspect the key is finding what is the original source of this "50 to 100 years" assertion, which multiple online sites/articles have been "parroting" over all these years.

  65. JQuintana

    Just by the nature of the materials used to make them. Not to mention the environments they are stored in. Plastics, glue, humidity, dry air, heat, cold, it's all a recipe for short shelf lives.

    I understand you have a bent towards digital but please don't pass around false information. They both use the same materials.

  66. DaveF

    Have you watched any of the show? I’ve seen some of the articles about her, but haven’t watched it yet. I’m wondering if it’s worth checking out.

    I haven’t, I’m sorry – I had to double check just to be sure I spelled her name right.

  67. jcroy

    The entire argument completely falls apart if one of the original "axioms" was just "manufactured" by marketing folks, with no laboratory studies backing it up.

    I concur. But it would go against common logic to think that LP's, vhs tapes, and CD's can last for decades but we should just accept that DVD's will deteriorate after only 10 years or so. No one in their right mind would assume that to be the case, unless they were told to expect it.

  68. I never bought any DVDs with the idea that I would resell them or that they would appreciate in value. I'm not sure what would give anyone that idea. As far as their longevity, how could anyone know how long they were going to last? We only find that out by waiting and seeing how long they actually last. I have DVDs I burned 20 years ago that still work. And factory DVDs I bought half as long ago that don't.

    I made backups of anything I wanted to keep over the long term. I ripped my favorite shows and created data folders with uncompressed files, about 1GB per 50 minute episode. I have them on 5TB external drives. I largely view them from those drives not only for convenience sake, but with an eye for keeping the original discs as backups. I really wouldn't know if a lot of my discs are still good because I haven't touched them in years. I'm more concerned with keeping functional off-site backups of my 5TB drives.

  69. Gary OS

    I concur. But it would go against common logic to think that LP's, vhs tapes, and CD's can last for decades but we should just accept that DVD's will deteriorate after only 10 years or so. No one in their right mind would assume that to be the case, unless they were told to expect it.

    Here is a counterexample to this logic ^

    Back in the 1990s, I already had pressed audio cds whch were "rotting" away. These rotted discs were semi to non functional after a decade or so.

    So by the time dvd came around in 1997-1998, I never believed they would have any longer longevity than my already rotted away audio cds. I just considered it my lucky day if my dvd discs ever lasted longer.

  70. Technically if I really wanted something to have a very high longevity, I would etch it out on large stone tablets or large sheets of stainless steel which doesn't corrode or rust easily.

    :rock:

  71. jcroy

    Here is a counterexample to this logic ^

    Back in the 1990s, I already had pressed audio cds whch were "rotting" away. These rotted discs were semi to non functional after a decade or so.

    So by the time dvd came around in 1997-1998, I never believed they would have any longer longevity than my already rotted away audio cds. I just considered it my lucky day if my dvd discs ever lasted longer.

    Ok. To each his own. But I'm betting the average person expects DVD's or Blu's to last longer than a decade. Maybe I'm all wet on that, but I'd be really surprised if your expectation was the norm.

    Oh, and for what it's worth, I've got many CDs that are over 30 years old and they still play fine. Never had one go bad on me yet.

  72. Gary OS

    Oh, and for what it's worth, I've got many CDs that are over 30 years old and they still play fine. Never had one go bad on me yet.

    Were these mostly cd discs relesed by big major record labels?

    Or were you the type of person who purchased a lot of cds released by small or obscure independent record companies?

  73. Gary OS

    Ok. To each his own. But I'm betting the average person expects DVD's or Blu's to last longer than a decade. Maybe I'm all wet on that, but I'd be really surprised if your expectation was the norm.

    Sometimes when I'm really bored, I pick out some random dvd dics from my collection and rip the discs' isos on the computer to see whether they are still functional.

    A number of years ago, I went through all the dvd discs which I had originally purchase back in the late 1990s and early 2000s, by ripping their isos to the computer. (At the time, most of these old discs were around 15+ years old). It was my lucky day that it turned out that all these old discs were still functional and didn't rot away (yet).

    (If there's no obvious problems, an 8+ gigabytes sized dvd disc should only take around 11-12 minutes to rip the iso entirely on the computer).

  74. DennisBassi

    Well I have been purchasing DVDs since 1998, have them all and have never had a single one fail, with some of them over 20 years old.

    I have bought both new dvds and videos and on very rare occasions ,they were blank when I tried to play them. I have also had several dvds that would not play after a few years due to the cheap ink used for putting a picture onto the disc, gradually seeping right through to the other side and making them unplayable.. I have had many dvds that I copied from videos or other dvds that would play on the dvd player that I had but when I updated to a better player, many would no longer play. I have always bought dvd/bluray players that play all regions and also both PAL and NTSC discs. For less than $100 each I bought a couple of such players locally and they lasted for many years without any problems despite the cheap price to buy them. Only recently I needed to replace the bluray/dvd players but they still cost me less than $100 for each player. I was surprised that the price hadn't changed.All I have to do is enter a 4 digit code to change the region.The 4 digit code was supplied with the player. It never fails and I can buy dvds/blurays from any country without worrying whether they will play on my players.

  75. I have had a select few DVDs fail, but that is very rare so far (knock on wood 🙂 ).
    As for dvd values, I have seen some fluctuate in value and go down but generally the ones that I notice go down are movies that get rereleased (even if the earlier edition was better). The ones I find the most that have higher values (both in movies and tv) are releases that are out of print, more obscure or not as popular, and sometimes (but not always) were not out very long. This isn’t always the case (and I don’t really follow values a lot anyway, I just notice when I come across them) but that’s just what I’ve found.

  76. Carabimero

    I made backups of anything I wanted to keep over the long term. I ripped my favorite shows and created data folders with uncompressed files, about 1GB per 50 minute episode. I have them on 5TB external drives.

    Same here….I’ve ripped all my hundreds of series (thousands of episodes) to large external USB drives as well, and saved my discs as backups. I’ve even gone a step further and created backup external drives too, in case a few fail here and there, so I don’t have to re-rip the DVD’s hopefully, which is more time consuming than copying a file.
    The files play just fine when connected via USB to our HD and 4K TVs, which makes it even more convenient, and I believe some tvs even upres the picture quality as well, just as many blu Ray and 4K players do with DVDs.

    That said, I still keep all my DVDs arranged on a shelf to enjoy the aesthetic. I never bought them as an investment, but the collector in me has enjoyed the thrill of hunting them down over the years and displaying them, in addition to the enjoyment of revisiting favorite shows when the mood strikes. A file on a hard drive is nice, but it can’t replace the aesthetic of a nicely packaged tv series dvd set!

  77. Gary OS

    Ok. To each his own. But I'm betting the average person expects DVD's or Blu's to last longer than a decade. Maybe I'm all wet on that, but I'd be really surprised if your expectation was the norm.

    Oh, and for what it's worth, I've got many CDs that are over 30 years old and they still play fine. Never had one go bad on me yet.

    I certainly had expectation of multiple decades for the vast majority and haven't been disappointed CD/LD/DVD/BD.

    Almost the entirety of DVDs that I have that became unplayable were those DVD18 discs and many of those were dead/bad out of the wrapper. I can't remember a std factory pressed DVD5 or 9 that ever rotted.

    Those HDDVD/DVD flipper discs — I had several that wouldn't play properly, but that wasn't rot issues.

    Over 1000 LD's I had 20-30 that became unplayable in the 1990-2000's and most of those were early Discovision or Columbia Tristar. Probably an equal number that played fine but just were ugly after awhile — again the majority were Columbia-Tristar. The couple hundred I have left have not developed issues in the last 20 years including some of the known bad actors (T2, Beauty and Beast WIP) — it seems to one's that were going to go bad did so and the rest sit stable.

    I don't remember ever having a factory pressed CD that became bad though that was likely only a few hundred.

    BD — 2 or 3 of the known Criterion batch, but all were replaced quickly by Criterion with good copies. I need to recheck some of the other known titles.

    Even the CD and DVDs I burned as backup/archive from 5-12 years ago have all done well so far.

  78. I've never had a pressed CD or DVD go bad. If you handle them properly and take care of them, there's no reason they shouldn't last a good, long time. I still have CD's from the 80's that play just fine.

    But, no, I wouldn't expect them to last "forever," either.

  79. There's a whole thread around here somewhere about a whole slew of WB DVDs manufactured by a certain vendor around 2006-2008 which were basically defective. They worked just fine at first, and right around the 10 year mark people are discovering that they are failing with a very high frequency. Often people are experiencing the exact same disc from a multi-disc set that fails. The discs simply are not readable and do not play any longer. I've owned several of these discs myself, and collectively they cost a fair chunk of money and would be expensive to replace. These discs were stored for years in the dark in sealed bins in climate-controlled conditions and failed anyway. In a few cases they are out of print now or only available as MOD discs. WB has been mostly responsive and forthcoming about supporting and replacing these products, if you know how to go about it. But that is far from guaranteed for the entire universe of DVDs that have been pressed and sold over the years from multiple studios and labels.

    The point is, while it may not be prevalent (yet), some DVDs do eventually go bad – it's really not debatable. You can chalk it up to manufacturing defects, or problematic formats like DVD18, and say that if produced correctly DVDs should last a long time, but the truth is most of us really never know to what standards hardly any pressed DVD was manufactured. It remains unknown whether failures will become a bigger problem as some DVDs reach 20 or eventually 30 years of age and beyond.

    However, I think this problem is largely conspicuous to DVD technology specifically. CDs are a different technology that seems to be highly durable. They have failures also, but it seems much less common than for DVDs. Blu-ray was design to address some of these issues also, and so Blu-ray failures are pretty rare also.

    Ultimately as DVDs age they are clearly at risk of failing. At what rate is uncertain. If you have a large collection then I would expect most of it will probably survive for many decades, but you will almost certainly encounter a few failed discs at some point. So if you don't bother ripping your disc based content then you assume the risk of losing access to it at some point. And maybe that is okay. Maybe ripping, backing up and storage is not worth all the hassle to you. Maybe you'll just have to plan to re-purchase some things at some point, assuming you want them that bad and that they are even still available. It's a judgement call for each collector individually.

  80. I think BDs have far better scratch protection than DVDs, so they can be far more durable in terms of damage from actual handling.

    But I think they’re always potentially going to be iffy because of the glue between layers. I think most will be fine, especially when cared for, but occasionally the glue is gonna go on a disc here and there and there’s not much you can do to plan for it.

  81. JQuintana

    Where did any studio or movie disc maker state in writing that discs would last "X" amount of years? I know of NONE. So how can you feel "cheated"? It was and is a gamble to own these.

    Um..excuse me,..here in the UK we had a weekly TV science and Technology series called 'Tomorrows World', and I remember when DVDs were being talked about on that show and how they were going to last us a lifetime! We were led to believe that unlike video tape that would randomly get chewed up in a video player with visual depreciation the more often it was played, DVD was the invention of the century for Home Media and that being a digital optical disc, nothing need to touch the surface as it would be read by a laser and would therefore last a lifetime!!

    Now many years later we are talking about disc rot!!

  82. JQuintana

    Where did any studio or movie disc maker state in writing that discs would last "X" amount of years? I know of NONE. So how can you feel "cheated"? It was and is a gamble to own these.

    It just depends on the disc. I have had a couple DVD titles already go bad(both Universal) but the majority of rewatches of titles I own play flawlessly going back to 1997. And yes I just checked them a few months ago.

    Although no one can be absolutely certain about the life span of discs, I have read that CD, and DVD should last 30+ years, Blu-Rays from 70-200 years, and recordable media like DVD-R lasting 15+ years.

  83. I have DVDs all the way back to 2000, and only a few DVD-18s have failed. Now some of those circa 2000 non-anamorphic DVDs look bad (“True Lies” — ugh!!) but it’s not the fault of the media.

    As to the topic: I own hundreds and hundreds of DVDs/Blu-rays/UHD discs; but as this is a *hobby* I don’t even try to make money off of them. If an old disc is replaced with a new one I just pass the old one along to any friends and/or relatives that might want them.

    These days I’m purchasing most modern TV series on digital (simply to get them in HD) and it really seems odd to me that I don’t have these on my shelf and yet somehow “own” them. The BOTTOM LINE is that these purchases are most definitely worth nothing — except to provide me with entertainment. Ultimately, that’s all I need them to do.

  84. John Dirk

    Lifespan cannot even be guaranteed for the most perfect "machine" ever created [humans] so why should DVD's or anything else be expected to do so.

    We are very far from being the most perfect machine ever created. What other species on Earth other than humans, kill their own kind for pleasure ( or religious reasons in the case of humans)? Perhaps there are far more perfect and intelligent species elsewhere in the Universe or Universes. Heaven forbid if they should ever land here on Earth and see what we have become.

  85. Sorry, but I hate sets like these. I was really happy to buy the British complete Blu ray set of the original series, which fits nicely on the shelf with all my other DVD/Blus. I was equally delighted to replace the plastic travesty of the animated DVDs with the nice neat case of the Blu rays.

  86. BobO’Link

    That's a pretty standard disclaimer. It's essentially saying "These might or might not come out in 2004 depending on numerous factors over which we may have little control." Basically a catch-all so fans upset that one or more seasons don't come out when they were told don't have a leg to stand on with complaints about the set(s) being "late." FWIW, they did all see release by the end of 2004 with S4 coming in December that year. They also commanded rather high prices, just like all Trek series, the first few years following release. But in those years so did lots of other series full season sets (most were in the $50- $100+ range).

    IIRC, those tricorder sets didn't price drops to the current levels until the release of the remastered BR sets that contained the remastered episodes with original visual effects and the updated visual effects.

    In that case, I misinterpreted the meaning. I thought Paramount was saying Something along the lines of they wont be available forever so get them while supplies last

  87. cinemiracle

    We are very far from being the most perfect machine ever created. What other species on Earth other than humans, kill their own kind for pleasure ( or religious reasons in the case of humans)? Perhaps there are far more perfect and intelligent species elsewhere in the Universe or Universes. Heaven forbid if they should ever land here on Earth and see what we have become.

    Let's respectfully agree to disagree on this one so as not to veer into forbidden territory or derail the thread. I mean, I love Star Trek too but I recognize it as fiction. 🙂

  88. TJPC

    In my part of Canada, (close to Toronto), our library system buys multiple copies of virtually every new movie and TV show on DVD and Blu ray, and many catalogue titles and even Warner Archive. When you borrow a copy you get to take it home and keep it for a week. It does sometimes take a while to get the one you reserve.

    Worth

    The library has blu-rays? You're lucky – Toronto's library system is DVD only.

    It's the same with London's Public Library system. While I've found them to be far superior to the Library system in the Near North Ontario region in nearly every other respect, their complete lack of Blu-ray disc availability puzzles me to no end, as the North Bay Public Library had racks of them! Ironically, I never quite got around to borrowing any of their Blu-rays before our move south last summer.

    CHEERS! 🙂

  89. TJPC

    Sorry, but I hate sets like these. I was really happy to buy the British complete Blu ray set of the original series, which fits nicely on the shelf with all my other DVD/Blus. I was equally delighted to replace the plastic travesty of the animated DVDs with the nice neat case of the Blu rays.

    Not me. This set is still one of my most watched, and cherished DVD series.
    View attachment 54645

    The remastered picture is in line with what I saw on TV from the age of five with re-runs of TOS, except better. Beautiful disc art, and color coded season sets. Few TV DVD sets over the years had so much care into the design of product, in fact Hawaii 5-0 is the only other set I can think of that compares to this set.

    By the way- if you ever think I'm typing while drunk when I post, I'm not. It is the MF'N spell check dictating what it thinks I should be typing. Sometimes I dont have the time to go back and correct its BS.

  90. In 2012, I bought the first box set (episodes 1-40) of YAWARA! A FASHIONABLE JUDO GIRL, a Japanese animated TV series from 1989, from its distributor, The Right Stuf, for $19.99. Today, Amazon lists it as selling for $149.99.

    http://www.amazon.com/Yawara-Fashi…ie=UTF8&qid=1548546040&sr=1-1&keywords=Yawara

    [​IMG]

    When I looked for it on The Right Stuf website, a search for it turned up zero results.

    It's a wonderful show.

    For the record, the entire series ran for 124 eps., but no subsequent box sets came out in the U.S.

    I can't promise that any other box sets I own have appreciated in value so much, but then I haven't checked. I have tons of anime box sets and it's quite possible many are now out of print and command high prices.

    ADDENDUM: Here's one I bought from Amazon for $18.99 in 2015. Look at the price now:

    http://www.amazon.com/Elfen-Lied-C…r=1-3&keywords=elfen+lied+complete+collection

    That's sheer insanity.

  91. Bryan^H

    Not me. This set is still one of my most watched, and cherished DVD series.
    View attachment 54645

    The remastered picture is in line with what I saw on TV from the age of five with re-runs of TOS, except better. Beautiful disc art, and color coded season sets. Few TV DVD sets over the years had so much care into the design of product, in fact Hawaii 5-0 is the only other set I can think of that compares to this set.

    By the way- if you ever think I'm typing while drunk when I post, I'm not. It is the MF'N spell check dictating what it thinks I should be typing. Sometimes I dont have the time to go back and correct its BS.

    This was the first tv series set I ever bought on dvd and it got me started on this hobby. As a kid I watched STOS re-runs, almost to the point of memorizing them, so it was appropriate that Trek was my first tv series on dvd. I had purchased a lot of the episodes on vhs (at $12.99 a pop) in the 1980's so I loved finding the series on dvd. I did finally get rid of the tricorder cases for more traditional storage, but I still have the discs and they play just fine. And I still love the series, hokey sets and all.

  92. Last year a lady on the other side of my city in Australia got on a Sat/Sun early morning Buy Swap & Sell program offer a number DVD sets etc of British TV shows her Mother had when she had been in hospital n Mom wanted daughter to get rid of them. I was in bed at the time and did not get the number and had to wait until 10am, nearly 4 hours little to find the phone number4 on the stations web page. I called and took a train straight over there with the $200 asked. All she had sold was a DVD of the first 3 episodes of an iconic Aussie series from the 1970s 70s called The Sullivans(set in WW2) which were very poor quality cutdown from 2" VTR to U-matic although the rest of the 1400 odd episodes are much better quality and not reduced to U-Matic as far as I can see. I took along a pull along two wheel shopping trolley and over filled it and she filled two supermarket plastic bags with the res and tied them to the hand of the trolley and I successfully to a bus to the City and then the train home without mishap. A keen British TV show collector, there was only 3-4 sets I did not have. All for $200 and no fares to pay as I get free weekend travel over the city as an aged pensioner. Also last years I happened on a Scout's fair and a lady let me have a lot of discs for the $7 I had on hand. It included, newish, the complete Everybody Loves Raymond box set and a British Sherlock series, a total bargain and I wanted them. That is the pattern outside of discs dumped outside houses or at Thrift shops which go for nix and old LPs have prices like $25-50 a piece in any condition. I don't use streaming services.

  93. I don't know why everyone compares the value of their sets to the most recent sales prices on the same sets by the studios who release them. Most catalog sets have been out for a long time and studios routinely mark their DVD sets down through huge markdowns just to clear out their inventory. Plus, Star Trek DVD sets have been out for a long time.

    Plus, DVD sets are not something that you invest your money in, they will not return your investment. This is why I have always detested Disney, who has always treated its animation DVD releases as some sort of collector's investment through the means of "retiring" DVD releases after a few months.

    Just like homes and automobiles, purchased items always depreciate in value. They aren't like baseball cards, collectable card games or comic books, that are true investment areas … and it amazes me how consumers are still confused and shocked by this.

  94. tempest21

    Just like homes and automobiles, purchased items always depreciate in value. They aren't like baseball cards, collectable card games or comic books, that are true investment areas … and it amazes me how consumers are still confused and shocked by this.

    As a rule they aren't, but short production runs, and wanted DVD series equal high dollar value. Check out nearly anything from BCI. Many titles go for 10X the initial retail price(sealed) on E-Bay.

  95. tempest21

    They aren't like baseball cards, collectable card games or comic books, that are true investment areas…

    And those things aren't as valuable as people seem to think, unless they're rare, highly sought after items in perfect condition.

  96. Everything must be perfect. My family kept a Canadian $10.00 bill with the last king on it for years and years in a envelope in a drawer. When my mother passed away at 92, I took it to a local dealer. He examined it, and found a microscopic fold on one corner. He estimated its value for me, which was … $10.00!

  97. BobO’Link

    Actually… they are.

    I have thousands of comics. Only a handful are worth $100+ with the rest firmly in the $.25-$.50 range. That includes dozens of Superman and Batman titles from the early 60s, most of which are worth their original cover price which means I lost money due to inflation. The only ones I'd purchased back then that are worth anything are the first few Gold Key Star Trek comics. Like my DVD/BR collection I do not purchase with an eye towards them being an "investment." I simply purchase what I like to read.

    If you don't believe that then you need to talk to those misguided people in the 90s who got into comics as an "investment." Most lost their shirt buying alternate covers, "limited" edition titles, and the flavor of the month superhero books. Hardly a week goes by at the LCS where someone brings in a long box (holds ~300) of comics expecting to get rich only to discover it's worth less than $100 – if they drive 70 miles to a city where there's a store that will buy them.

    I strongly suspect the comic book "direct market" completely destroyed the market.

  98. jcroy

    I strongly suspect the comic book "direct market" completely destroyed the market.

    Actually, the direct market saved comics first. Then it destroyed them.

    By the 80s, newsstands no longer really wanted to carry low profit items like comics. And the companies were eating it on returns. The direct market, though, allowed them to virtually print on demand. No huge overstocks, no huge overrun, just print for the orders, maybe a few more for reorders, and that's it.

    However, it was the speculators of the 90s that was the beginning of destroying the market. "WE'RE ALL GONNA GET RICH ON YOUNGBLOOD #1!!!" Holofoil, variant covers, die cut covers, style over substance, new #1s every few months… and the industry learned nothing, because that's all still happening to an even larger degree. Oh, and the retreat into the direct market turned it into the direct market ghetto that they can't escape from, and they have no new readers coming in because prices are too high and books aren't available in 7-11s and grocery stores anymore so kids can't get 'em.

    Yeah, comics destroyed themselves.

  99. The Obsolete Man

    Actually, the direct market saved comics first. Then it destroyed them.

    By the 80s, newsstands no longer really wanted to carry low profit items like comics. And the companies were eating it on returns. The direct market, though, allowed them to virtually print on demand. No huge overstocks, no huge overrun, just print for the orders, maybe a few more for reorders, and that's it.

    However, it was the speculators of the 90s that was the beginning of destroying the market. "WE'RE ALL GONNA GET RICH ON YOUNGBLOOD #1!!!" Holofoil, variant covers, die cut covers, style over substance, new #1s every few months… and the industry learned nothing, because that's all still happening to an even larger degree. Oh, and the retreat into the direct market turned it into the direct market ghetto that they can't escape from, and they have no new readers coming in because prices are too high and books aren't available in 7-11s and grocery stores anymore so kids can't get 'em.

    Yeah, comics destroyed themselves.

    I remember some comic book speculators back in the 1980s.

    I remember back in the 80s when the late-70s era issues of The Uncanny X-Men (94 to around 143) were skyrocking in price on the aftermarket, I knew one person who would buy 2 or 3 copies of then-current post-#150 issues of The Uncanny X-Men in the hope that they would also skyrocket in price too in the future.

    Fast forward to the present day, these post-#150 issues of The Uncanny X-Men never went up in the price. At best for copies in "pristine mint" condition, they more or less just tracked inflation of the cover prices. Otherwise they were not worth much other than generic dump bin fodder.

  100. I made a small fortune from comic book speculation. There were a lot of key comic book issues I made a large profit on such as 25 copies each of Amazing Spiderman #298-314 (Todd McFarlane), 25 copies of Superman #75 (death issue), 25 copies of Ghost Rider #1 (Danny Ketch series), 25 copies each of New Mutants #84-100. It was pretty easy to tell back then which issues were worth the investment.

  101. Completely agree with DVD sets depreciating in value – I've noticed the same thing. I got my first DVD player back in early 2003 – I wasn't the huge movie aficionado at the time that I am now, but I primarily got it so I could watch The Sopranos on DVD – I didn't want to subscribe to HBO, so I just waited until each season was released to DVD, and binge-watched it that way. IIRC, it was actually cheaper to buy these DVD sets as they came out, than to pay for HBO each month.

    I then subsequently got more into getting seasons of TV shows on DVD, as opposed to watching them on TV (I preferred to binge-watch them all at once). Then, I got more into watching movies on DVD – however, while I would typically rent new movies on DVD from Blockbuster or Hollywood Video back in the 200X's, I preferred to buy the TV DVD sets – since I felt you were getting more for your money that way.

    And, some of these sets were quite expensive. Each season of The Sopranos on DVD was upwards of $70 – $80 each (unless they were on sale), and that was only for 12-13 episodes per season. Other HBO shows like The Wire, Rome, Deadwood, etc. were roughly the same price. Mainstream TV shows on DVD like Lost, Smallville, etc. were significantly less, i.e. typically $50 per season.

    Now, you can get most seasons of TV shows on Blu-ray for less than $50 each, and Blu is a far superior format to DVD. And, one of the biggest travesties (LOL) is that you can get the entire series of The Sopranos on Blu-ray for only a little more than a single season of the show cost back in the day.

    That all being said, I don't regret buying TV shows on DVD at all. They were great, and in many cases I'm keeping these – and not upgrading to Blu-ray. It's too expensive to upgrade everything, and most of these shows look OK on my HD TV set.

    Plus, many TV shows have never made it to Blu yet – and probably never well.

  102. Not to de-rail this thread too much, but re: a previous post about Marvel comics:

    I had stopped collecting Marvel & DC comics completely by the early '90's (I was only into Dark Horse's SW comics & Grendel at that point) & never got any from that era. However, going into comic stores during this time, you couldn't avoid Marvel's multiple foil/cardboard/etc. covers for the re-booted X-men/ Spider-man/etc. comics. The art was cookie-cutter crap, and they expected us to fork over good money to get multiple covers of these issues? Yeah, right. Thankfully, I've heard that most of these comics are all but worthless today. I read on another board that someone couldn't even give them away 😉

    I had someone try to sell me Marvel stock during the mid '90's (when they were having financial issues), and I just laughed at him – LOL.

  103. When I purchased my very first DVD player, I needed something to play on it.

    My first DVD purchase was the Toy Story (1 & 2) Ultimate Toy Box set.

    [​IMG]

    I thought I was the luckiest guy around to have that set. I've upgraded both those films, of course, as technology has advanced. But the value of that set hasn't depreciated for me one bit as I still consider it one of the crown jewels of my collection! 😀

  104. Mike Frezon

    When I purchased my very first DVD player, I needed something to play on it.

    My first DVD purchase was the Toy Story (1 & 2) Ultimate Toy Box set.

    [​IMG]

    I thought I was the luckiest guy around to have that set. I've upgraded both those films, of course, as technology has advanced. But the value of that set hasn't depreciated for me one bit as I still consider it one of the crown jewels of my collection! 😀

    I think I still have that one in a bucket in the attic somewhere.

  105. The Drifter

    Completely agree with DVD sets depreciating in value – I've noticed the same thing. I got my first DVD player back in early 2003 – I wasn't the huge movie aficionado at the time that I am now, but I primarily got it so I could watch The Sopranos on DVD – I didn't want to subscribe to HBO, so I just waited until each season was released to DVD, and binge-watched it that way. IIRC, it was actually cheaper to buy these DVD sets as they came out, than to pay for HBO each month.

    I then subsequently got more into getting seasons of TV shows on DVD, as opposed to watching them on TV (I preferred to binge-watch them all at once). Then, I got more into watching movies on DVD – however, while I would typically rent new movies on DVD from Blockbuster or Hollywood Video back in the 200X's, I preferred to buy the TV DVD sets – since I felt you were getting more for your money that way.

    And, some of these sets were quite expensive. Each season of The Sopranos on DVD was upwards of $70 – $80 each (unless they were on sale), and that was only for 12-13 episodes per season. Other HBO shows like The Wire, Rome, Deadwood, etc. were roughly the same price. Mainstream TV shows on DVD like Lost, Smallville, etc. were significantly less, i.e. typically $50 per season.

    Now, you can get most seasons of TV shows on Blu-ray for less than $50 each, and Blu is a far superior format to DVD. And, one of the biggest travesties (LOL) is that you can get the entire series of The Sopranos on Blu-ray for only a little more than a single season of the show cost back in the day.

    That all being said, I don't regret buying TV shows on DVD at all. They were great, and in many cases I'm keeping these – and not upgrading to Blu-ray. It's too expensive to upgrade everything, and most of these shows look OK on my HD TV set.

    Plus, many TV shows have never made it to Blu yet – and probably never well.

    You've reminded me that I once bought the first season of Sex and the City on VHS in a box set (12 eps.), used, for $5–I forget how many tapes, but Amazon says three. This was sometime in the first decade of the 21st century. I watched the set once, put it in a box in the closet and will probably never watch it again. But if I hadn't picked up that set I probably never would have watched the show and seen what the fuss was about. As for resale, there are copies of the VHS box set of Season 1 on Amazon for sale–at about $5.

    I might have watched the first season of The Sopranos if only I'd found a set like that for that price. I've still never seen the show, other than a few minutes of random episodes here and there.

  106. John*Wells

    I was just browsing Amazon. I purchased the Star Trek animated series in Blu Ray. Last week for 27.98. Looks like the law of supply and demand applies. The price is now $37.98

    Looks like you got it just in time!

  107. bmasters9

    Looks like you got it just in time!

    Next up is Enterprise. Then TNG. And hopefully DS9 and voyager will come but not counting on them. Thinking about giving my SD treks to my nephew. He’s 10. Likes adventure and space

  108. John*Wells

    Next up is Enterprise. Then TNG. And hopefully DS9 and voyager will come but not counting on them. Thinking about giving my SD treks to my nephew. He’s 10. Likes adventure and space

    I'm betting your nephew will enjoy 'em, just like my nephew Eli enjoyed those first-and-second-season I Love Lucy releases that I gave him (he enjoyed those immensely, so much so that over time, I ended up getting him the remainder of the series [mostly from Amazon, though I got that fifth season's worth for him at the Wal-Mart in Simpsonville]; he now has the whole series [regular and Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour], and can't get enough of it)!

  109. bmasters9

    I'm betting your nephew will enjoy 'em, just like my nephew Eli enjoyed those first-and-second-season I Love Lucy releases that I gave him (he enjoyed those immensely, so much so that over time, I ended up getting him the remainder of the series [mostly from Amazon, though I got that fifth season's worth for him at the Wal-Mart in Simpsonville]; he now has the whole series [regular and Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour], and can't get enough of it)!

    One thing I noticed on the TOS Blu Ray. Is that at the end of each episode, it shows the Desilu logo. That I understand. But after that the CBS logo comes up and says 1978 paramount.

    My question is why 1978 copyright? I’m assuming it has to do with the ownership maze that trek has been through over the years?

  110. John*Wells

    Next up is Enterprise. Then TNG. And hopefully DS9 and voyager will come but not counting on them. Thinking about giving my SD treks to my nephew. He’s 10. Likes adventure and space

    Don’t forget to check out the Amazon.uk prices for Blu ray sets. I found their prices a steal, and of course they are all region free.

  111. John*Wells

    One thing I noticed on the TOS Blu Ray. Is that at the end of each episode, it shows the Desilu logo. That I understand. But after that the CBS logo comes up and says 1978 paramount.

    My question is why 1978 copyright? I’m assuming it has to do with the ownership maze that trek has been through over the years?

    Somehow, the copyright year was never seen on any Desilu program in the 1966-67 season (nor early on in the 1967-68 season) in the original broadcast run.

    In the case of Star Trek, after having lost one lawsuit over this to Thunderbird Films, eventually Paramount was able to buy back the copyright rights to the pre-1967 Star Trek episodes. The earliest Star Trek episode to be registered with the Paramount copyright was "Wolf in the Fold" on September 19, 1967, the date the final answer print was finished before being given to NBC (which first broadcast it on December 22, 1967).

    ~Ben

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